The Socio- psychological impacts of corona virus.

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Tahira Begum's picture
The Socio- psychological impacts of corona virus.

They say that even the worst of situations have something in it for us to learn and understand. When the corona virus issue was first reported from Wuhan, rest of the world was not bothered about it much. Reason was that at individual level everyone was sure that since they’re not living in China and their lifestyle is nothing similar to Chinese, there is no way this problem can reach us. With the spread of this virus throughout the globe, we have realized that viruses, bacteria and microorganisms do not respect the state demarcated borders and they certainly do not care about human race. To a virus, we all are living beings that are potential hosts.
A microscopic element caused a giant wave of panic and uncertainty to people all over the world. Suddenly people are realizing the importance of science and technology for the service of mankind instead of making deadly weapons for border security. Amidst the tense environment, there is a dense cloud of fake news, half-truths and misinformation via social media that further depresses the mood. These days mainstream media only discuss the deaths and number of people infected by the virus, which further deteriorates the psychological health of a person.
We are experiencing many social changes as well. The people we normally liked for their generosity have turned into selfish hoarders. Because of the advised social distancing, we refrain from physically showing our love and happiness for friends and family for the sake of their health. Considering the deadly results of the virus on older people, we became even more worried about the elderly in our family. People having family thousands of miles away have a different level of anxiety. The Russian Roulette like gaming of the virus has forced us to unlearn formerly acceptable behaviors and relearn safer ones.
Everyday routine has also greatly changed. Since most people are working from home, the workload for an average housemaker has increased. There is a debate whether workspace is necessary when some jobs can easily be done from homes. Although in normal condition one might be happy staying home, but in a pandemic when one knows they are not supposed to leave the house, it causes irritation and frustration. This confirms that even if someone is an introvert, socialization and change of environment is a human need. Where food, water and air are needs for staying alive, socializing is an emotional and psychological need. Ironically, the survival of the social animal resides in exercising social distancing.
This epidemic followed by the practice of social distancing, has provided people a chance to know themselves better. The sense of boredom is helping people to explore and find new hobbies. From cooking and baking to arts and craft, people love to share their activities with others via social media, inspiring more people in the process. We can see that people are starting to think about earth as a living organism itself. They think that the earth is cleansing and trying to fix herself by forcing humans to stop their destructive machines and factories. In a way, this one virus has united people of the world against the deadly virus. It is providing people with a vision of earth as one home for a family of 7 billion people.
It is also generating various debates among people of the developing states about the redistribution of budgets where education and healthcare should be given a priority. Other than that, people are celebrating doctors, nurses and cleaning services as heroes without capes. This is a great change as we normally take these people for granted. The pandemic has taught us that a hero is not necessarily a soldier in uniform defending borders of a state.
Religious figures are seen exploiting the situation according to their moods. When the situation was in Wuhan, many religious figures were calling it a punishment on sinful people for various sins such as haram consumption, atrocities against the Chinese Muslims and immodestly. Some even equated it as a revenge of God for the pain of Palestine and Kashmir. A video of Khadim Hussain Rizvi went viral where he was rejoicing over the situation in Wuhan, asking God to punish China and its allies even harder for the plight of Uighur Muslims in China. An Israeli health minister declared coronavirus as punishment for homosexuality. But as soon as the virus spread in Muslim majority countries, clerics spun their words into “a chance of brush off sins”, “God is testing our faith” and even propagating conspiracy theories to blame people of opposing faiths. This situation is not only causing panic and unjustified hate towards other faiths but also causing a shake in people’s faith and lack of trust in religious clerics. It is encouraging people to wonder where is God in all this commotion and what should be the dynamics of relationship with God once the cure is invented.
Because there is no vaccine available at the moment, the feeling of restlessness prevails. It seems that the virus is not going any time soon and it is determined to change us in many ways, including our cleaning habits and our social interactions. Even though fear and panic encircling us, all hopeful eyes are on the scientists of the world who will succeed in finding a cure to fight this virus and weaken its world domination.

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Dworkin's picture
Tahira,

Tahira,

You have given a good overview of how the situation has affected us. As a retired teacher and community worker, I tend to think of those people who were already isolated by loneliness, poverty and/or mental health problems. There will be many unreported personal stories.

A positive is that those people who do venture out (including me) are generally very friendly, with words of encouragement from a safe social distance. Some have called it a 'wartime spirit'.

Keep well,

D.

boomer47's picture
@Dworkin

@Dworkin

" I tend to think of those people who were already isolated by loneliness, poverty and/or mental health problem"

Excellent point .

In my city of Adelaide South Australia, 25 percent of all domiciles are single person occupancy.

The corona virus pandemic has had minimal effect on the way I live, especially on the people I see..

I have been retired for 20 years.For many years, I saw no one month to month except people at shops.I have struggled with mental health issues all of my adult life. Isolating and alcoholism was how I coped,. especially after I retired, in 1999.

I stopped drinking in 2002. After a "severe life event" in 2012, I started seeing a psychologist and a shrink.The shrink diagnosed Asperger's Syndrome and put together a cocktail of psychotropics which keep me stable. The drugs deal with my mental health issues, not the Asperger's, which is not a mental health issue, but a different way of experiencing the world.

The psychologist helped me enormously with cognitive therapy. These days, I only see her once every 3 months, for monitoring. With our health system, visits to her have never cost me anything,

Yes, my social activities have virtually ceased. I contact family by phone and email. My [only] friend by email, voice mail and video link

The only thing I've really noticed is shopping. I like to shop every day, sometimes twice a day. Lately it's not even once a week. I now do more also on line shopping, also use Ebay a lot, mainly small purchases, around $20 or less. .

So no, not a huge difference for me .

The foregoing is an explanation. I am not whining or complaining. I'm content with my life.

IMO there are far worse things in life than being lonely from-time-to-time.

IMO feeling unloved is probably the greatest cause of misery I've ever had. Perhaps that's why I consider loving and feeling loved are the most importance things in life. .

Dworkin's picture
cranky47,

cranky47,

Thank you for sharing your experience, which I respect. Yes, I too have a diagnosis, in my case anxiety and depression. After leaving teaching my life became very different. The thing I miss now is going out on my own and sitting in a cafe just people watching and drinking a coffee. Many of the details in your reply are so similar to mine. I do live with my wife of 40 yrs, who has an active social life, and I am happy that she has that. For me, socialising is rare and I have to 'put on an act' to get through it.

On the OP subject, yes there are many folks coping with the situation on their own.

Good thoughts,

D.

boomer47's picture
@Dworkin

@Dworkin

" I do live with my wife of 40 yrs, "

I'm truly pleased for you.

My wife left after 12 years. The depression and the then undiagnosed Asperger's were just too much for her.

This forum serves the same function for me as your coffee shop.

Tahira Begum's picture
Dworkin,

Dworkin,

I agree with you. This situation has probably given us a collective sense of loneliness. Maybe people will start being more considerate.

we need more people like you <3

regards

Whitefire13's picture
Welcome Tahira!!!

Welcome Tahira!!!

Well “tinkle me pink”!!! One conspiracy propagated over here is ... the virus is a tool, set loose by China to take down “Trump” and wreck his stellar record for re-election...

Yes - at the very least, some people are being “forced” to take a break and think and re-evaluate ... others are facing some of the greatest challenges of their lives.

For myself, thing have been pretty much the same ... fuckin’ country life!

Tahira Begum's picture
Whitefire,

Whitefire,

First, thank you for the warm welcome!

Personally, I think you and I are in the same boat. I have not faced any huge change in life, so to speak. It is just that I do not have a very good memory associated with "staying grounded". That is making me a bit worried. Rest, just like you mentioned: things have been pretty much the same :)

Whitefire13's picture
@Tahira...” just that I do

@Tahira...” just that I do not have a very good memory associated with "staying grounded".

Do you mean punishment as a kid? Jesus, my parents didn’t have the patience for making sure I stayed “grounded” - they’d just beat my skinny white ass (the day’s before current “N American “white” punishment techniques”)...

See funny link. Russel Peters

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3gD1woa_Cbw

dogalmighty's picture
There are protocols for

There are protocols for sharing of tech/scientific information...those barriers are gone now with respect to this pathogen, and even lab process benchmark secrets have fallen to the need of a pandemic. We are all working together for survival. Too bad religion does the opposite, and prevents people from working together. Time for religion to go. Hopefully, some religious can see past their cognitive dissonance to realize religion doesn't instill coming together of humanity, it prevents it.

boomer47's picture
@Tahira

@Tahira

Welcome from Sunny South Australia, where it is presently raining and 15 C, which we consider cold

I liked your post a lot, very insightful I think.

Tahira Begum's picture
@Cranky47

@Cranky47

Thank you so much for your kind words!!

I was so nervous before writing this here.

checked out response just today.

Thank you for your encouraging words

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